Air Conditioning on Guam



Air conditioning on Guam definitely makes life more comfortable.


Almost all of us enjoy and appreciate the comfort air conditioning provides, and I hope the information on this page, and on the other pages of the site, will help you keep your air conditioning on Guam running efficiently, and maybe even help you save some money on service calls and power bills.


If you're a technician, you might find some information on this page, and on the other pages of the site, that helps make your job a little easier.


The best way to keep air conditioning on Guam, or anywhere for that matter, running efficiently, is to keep the filters clean, and clean the evaporator and condenser coils (and fans, when they need it) on a regular basis.


We have a thorough explanation of this on our air air conditioning maintenance page, and if you own a window air conditioner, you might want to read our page about how to clean window air conditioners.


If you're having a problem with your air conditioning on Guam and want to try to get it running yourself before you call for service, read your owner's manual carefully one more time; and you might find something that will help you on our air conditioning problem page, which was written as a basic troubleshooting guide for people who aren't technicians.


Keep the owner's manual for your air conditioner in a safe place.

Good manuals will have the wiring diagram and a troubleshooting guide for the air conditioner.

These will help you, or a technician, troubleshoot your unit more efficiently; which will help get your unit running sooner, and can even save you money in labor costs.


If you don't have the manual for your unit, I've searched the web sites of the major brands of air conditioning on Guam to see where you can get manuals on-line.

You can find manuals for Carrier residential units at www.residential.carrier.com; and for Carrier commercial units at www.carrieruniversity.com.


I think any dealer on island would be happy to give you a copy of the owners manual for your unit, but if it's an older model, they might not have it on hand.

In that case go to the web site of your units manufacturer, use their "Contact" page, give them the model and serial number of your unit, and request an owner's manual.


If you're planning to install some air conditioning and have never done it before, our air conditioning installation page describes the procedure.


To keep your outdoor unit as corrosion-free as possible, don't put it where water can run off the roof and drip on it.

It's best to install it with good overhead protection so that no roof run-off drains on it, or put it out in the open exposed to direct rain

I've observed that units installed in these types of locations last longer, and corrode at a much slower rate, than units that have roof water dripping and draining on them.


If you're shopping for air conditioning on Guam, you might be wondering which brand to buy.

A unit from any of the major American or Japanese brand names that have been on Guam for years will work fine.


You'll be depending on your air conditioner for years, so why not shop for it the way you shop for a car?

Take a look at the dealer and their personnel.

Do they look and act professional?

Does the dealer have a parts department and a shop area?

Do they stock parts for the model you're buying?

Do they have a service manual for the model you're buying?

What are the details of the warranty?


Shop and compare,

Let your pocketbook be your guide,

And get the best price and warranty you possibly can.


Read the warranty for your new air conditioning on Guam carefully.

I expect you'll find that the warranty covers labor for work done Monday through Friday during normal working hours, but it doesn't cover the overtime labor for evening and weekend service calls.

The reason is simple: the manufacturers only warranty labor at the regular hourly rate, and won't pay the dealer for overtime.

As a matter of fact, the manufacturers usually have a set schedule of labor allowed for any type of warranty work, and I've never seen a manufacturer's schedule that realistically covered all the time required to do the repairs out in the field.

The dealer doesn't get re-imbursed for any travel, troubleshooting, and repair time that exceeds the manufacturer's warranty schedule, so please keep this in mind if you call for warranty work after normal working hours, or on the weekend.


If you're trying to get the best service possible for your air conditioning on Guam, the best thing to do is ask your family and friends if they have personal experience with a company or technician who provided them with excellent service.


If you're a new technician getting started in our trade, and looking for ways to improve your proficiency on the job, "Modern Refrigeration and Air Conditioning" is a great textbook, and you'll find a review of it on our HVAC Book page.

If you're interested, our A/C circuit & cycle diagram page covers the basics of how the air conditioning cooling process works; and our A/C schematic page explains how to read a basic air conditioning electrical schematic.

You're also welcome to read our free Introduction to Air Conditioning and Refrigeration e book.
It's 98 pages of basic information, re-printed from a military training manual.


For new or experienced technicians working on air conditioning on Guam, our System Evaluation Manual has cycle diagrams, and guidance on how to evaluate pressures and temperatures for air conditioning and refrigeration systems, including air cooled and water cooled reciprocating chilled water plants.

You also might want to take a look at our air conditioning and electrical troubleshooting chart, which is 7 pages, re-printed from a military training manual.

And if you work on Trane package units, our page about troubleshooting Trane air conditioning controls explains how to troubleshoot Trane's solid state UCP controls.


Please feel free to contact me with any specific HVAC questions you might have, including questions about refrigeration on Guam, or air conditioning on Guam; or if you have questions or comments about this site.

Are you learning the HVAC Trade "on the job"?
If you would be interested in learning how to help yourself, your company, and your customers reduce utility costs; we highly recommend that you contact Schneider Universities and check out their free, on-line, energy management courses.
Completing some required courses can lead to a Professional Energy Manager Certificate, and it might be the first step towards changing your whole future.

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